Come Celebrate at this year’s Beer Mitzvah!

Did you know that most beer can be considered “kosher-style” when it does not contain lactose, gelatin, spices, fruit or fruit syrups! Come celebrate this new knowledge (unless you knew already, then come celebrate this old knowledge) and Temple Israel on April 28 at 1pm, at their first Beer Mitzvah celebration.

The event comes from the partnership of Oscar Delgado, Jr., who owns CA Draft Tech and is the founder of the CA Beer Society and Kimberlee MacVicar. We wanted to find out more about this unique event and got a chance to speak with Kimberlee.

Oh, and just in case someone is wondering, no, you do not need to be Jewish to attend!

kimberleeIs this the first time you’re doing a beer fundraiser? 

This will be the third time Oscar and I are partnering up to throw a beer fest, but it will be the first time at Temple Israel. We’re excited about this unique angle and to expand these breweries’ fan bases even more.

How long has the temple been in Alameda? 

Since 1920. It was founded by a dozen couples, including my great-grandparents, David & Diana Garfinkle. 2020 marks our 100th anniversary.

Who came up with the idea and why beer? 

I was the Fundraising Chair or Co-Chair for 10 years at the temple before “retiring” and returned to the role for this fiscal year. Knowing how much fun beer fests are and how great it is to work with Oscar, I wanted to bring one to the temple. Oscar came up with the awesome name. Beer creates a casual, fun setting to hang out with friends. It’s a positive vibe and culture that I wanted to bring to the temple and open the way for more people to visit and know/remember we’re here and a part of the East Bay Community.

I hear most beer is kosher. What makes a beer kosher? 

I stumbled onto an article one day that beer is technically kosher, but only the large corporations can afford certification. There isn’t really a demand for kosher beer, so it’s not an expense many start-up or micro breweries can afford to add to their budgets. It’s a shame kosher certification is financially unattainable or not sustainable for many businesses, particularly restaurants, as those kosher certifying agencies are just limiting their own choices, but don’t get me started!

The four main ingredients in beer – water, hops, wheat and yeast – are kosher, so beer not certified is “kosher-style.” They are not kosher or kosher-style when ingredients like gelatin, lactose, fruit and fruit syrups are added. For example, no stouts, bummer.  For this event, we’ve asked the breweries to bring beer that would fit this kosher-style list of ingredients. While Maui Brewing Company is participating and will be pouring beer of those ingredients, we can encourage folks to hit the stores later to buy their Pineapple Mana one, which is super yummy.

What’s included in the ticket? 

Ticket is $36 and comes with unlimited pours. No need to get in line to buy more beer tickets or possibly be left with unused ones. A chance to interact directly with these breweries and just have fun hanging out. Food is separate as we have two pop-ups coming to help them promote their businesses.

Where do the proceeds go to? What kind of programs will it support? 

The event will benefit Temple Israel. Programs supported will include primarily, our religious and Hebrew School, called Beit Bina, holiday celebrations, and gearing up for our 100th celebration next year. Lots to do to prepare for such a big milestone.

Will there be activities for non-beer drinkers who want to support? Are kids allowed? 

Kids are absolutely allowed and can come for free. Beer festivals are very family friendly despite the name. Admiral Malting will have a demo about malts used in many beers, cornhole boards will be out and the band, The Vinyl 4, will be performing twice. 

A big piece will be for people to vote their favorite beer as “The Chosen One.” We look to grow this inaugural event into an annual one making it larger and larger, with a larger footprint for more activities.

[button link=”https://www.eventbrite.com/e/beer-mitzvah-fest-celebrating-craft-beer-coming-of-age-tickets-59209619566″ color=”lightblue” newwindow=”yes”] Get Your Tickets! [/button]

#BeerMitzvah

*** Free parking
*** No refunds
*** Must be 21 and over to receive a wristband.
*** Children can attend for free as festivals are family friendly.
*** Food and soft drinks available for purchase.

The Jungle at the Curran

The Curran has brought “The Jungle” to the Bay Area after having sold out shows in New York and London. The play is based on a self made refugee camp that was located on the outskirts of the French city, Calais, from January 2015 to October 2016. Calais’s proximity to the UK, the desired final destination, is why many refugees continue to arrive there today.

The Jungle 2The show was written by British playwrights Joe Murphy and Joe Robertson whom lived at “The Jungle” for seven months, by choice. They created Good Chance theater in the middle of the camp. At the time of their arrival, there were already thousands of people from 25 different countries who had built restaurants, churches, and small living spaces on top of an old landfill. These great feats existing in terrible conditions made them want to get people to tell their stories. 

The show is set in an Afghan restaurant located in “The Jungle”. It took over three weeks for the Curran to transform itself into the final intimate space. Seats have been pulled out and the floor has been leveled with dirt. There are wood beams set up, small tables and benches. Due to the limited space to create the atmosphere, the audience is limited to 600 per show. Those with tickets near the stage area, will find themselves in the middle of the action, as actors go up and down aisles during intense meetings, protests, celebrations, and the final destruction of the location.

The Jungle 3The powerful performances bring to light the humanity behind the faces of many of the refugees, often just seen as pictures in the media, statistics, or charitable cases. It touches on the background of a few personal stories but, mostly revolves around the story behind the arrival and building of “The Jungle”. As everyone is desperately trying to hold on to hope, tensions arise. The countries each person represents also have political conflicts that fuel some incidents, but circumstances force them to acknowledge that they now have more in common. They need to get along to survive, and they do. It’s that unity, drive, hope and creativity that attracts the authorities, ultimately leading them to destroy the camp. Their public reasoning, it was getting too established and would attract more refugees. A falsehood similar to the situation here in the United States at the Mexican border. People do and will continue to arrive despite harsh conditions as they’re often not as bad as the situation the refugees are fleeing from. Also, They. Have. No. Where. Else. To. Go.

CQ_PGgQcThe play also gave voice to some of the uninvited volunteers that started to arrive after “The Jungle” started getting media attention. There is a discussion about wether they should be allowed. Most welcomed the potential help and exposure, while others hesitated. They stayed one night, two nights, and then they didn’t leave.

In a poignant moment in the play, these two entities confront each other. Okot (John Pfumojena) a 17-year old refugee, gives a speech to 18-year old volunteer, Beth (Rachel Redford). He takes off his shirt exposing a multitude of scars. She is asked why is she there. She speaks through tears and confusion. He tells her some of the reasons he had to flee his home, his family, and how each tragedy takes a toll on a person, on your identity. How parts of you die with each trauma. This is one of the most revealing parts of the play. Giving someone a few clothing items is not going to bring humanity back to a person. What’s legal is not always moral. Sometimes, the only choice, is to survive.

The JungleThe show is very emotional and honest. Those who consider themselves an “Ally” in these situations, should definitely see this play. A volunteer’s “help” can remind someone that there is good in the world. It can provide a temporary comfort. However, good intentions don’t often lead to progress. Understanding what leads people into these circumstances, not thinking you know a person’s situation better than they do, and speaking up before it happens does, as the countries often being fled too, are often part of the cause that created these unfortunate circumstances. 


Playing until May 19th 

Tickets and Location: https://sfcurran.com/shows/the-jungle/

Runtime: 2.5 Hours, 1 15 minute intermission

SPECIAL PERFORMANCES:

Open Caption: Sunday, April 28, 1pm

ASL: Saturday, May 11, 2pm

Audio Described: Saturday, May 18, 2pm

Watch the stage transformation


 

SDLFF – Frontera Filmmakers

F1The San Diego Latino Film Festival shows a variety of themed short film blocks. Every year I make sure to check out one of their showcases. This year I attended Frontera Filmmakers, featuring movies made by directors near our border town of San Diego and Tijuana. There has been a resurgence in filmmakers like no other time in history. The mix of films ranged from documentaries to horror to suspense, all unique in their storytelling approach.

One of the films that I enjoyed was the documentary Chicano Legacy: Students Empowering Students, directed by Horacio Jones, told about the struggles that occurred and are still occurring at UCSD, in terms of race relations and education. Many minority students at the school felt that they were not being represented or that there were even many people like themselves on campus. After some racial comments went up on social media by a fraternity house, students protested for change and argued that behavior like so, would not be tolerated on their campus. From there, they fought to have a Chicano mural be put up on campus. Through much blood, sweat, and tears, the students brought it to fruition with the help of Mario Torero, a local Peruvian artist. The documentary gives us the details of how it all happened and how the mural itself was created out of stone tiles made in China. It was an intricate process and the final reveal showcased a beautiful mural featuring Cesar Chavez, Barrio Logan, and the students who rallied for change. This was an eye-opening film for me, as I live in San Diego and had no idea that those events took place at UCSD. As a former student of UCSB, I myself have felt the same way as those students, as my race was hardly represented on campus. I thoroughly enjoyed the film and recommend it to everyone, students and non-students alike.

F2Another film that really caught my eye was El Amor No Existe (Love Does Not Exist), a short film directed by Fernando Fisher, about a treacherous love triangle involving a husband, wife, and the husband’s brother. The wife is mean and unhappy with her lot in life and seeks out the comfort of her husband’s brother while he is away at work as a police detective. The husband has no idea what is going on behind his back, but it is all revealed to him on the fateful day where he forgets his gun at home. To top it off, his teenage son, on the same day tells his father that he is gay. He goes to school on that same day and professes his love to another boy, who then proceeds to beat him up for his revelation. When the husband encounters his wife and brother having sex, what happens from there is suspenseful and dramatic and shocking to boot. When the son witnesses everything that happened with his family it becomes a heartbreaking tale. By the end we realize through the film’s story that love truly does not exist in our world. If you get a chance to see this, I would check it out because it was mind-blowing and interesting to watch unravel.

Only a few days to catch this and more at the San Diego Latino Film Festival: https://2019.sdlatinofilm.com/

SDLFF Kicks Off 25 Years

The annual Media Arts Center San Diego Latino Film Festival (SDLFF) kicked off this year’s event with their opening media party on February 22nd. Rich in culture and history, the SDLFF has been delighting and engaging fans for 25 years, and the media party did not disappoint. Hosted at One Bunk in Barrio Logan, the festivities featured legendary actors such as Pepe Serna, tequila infused cocktails, delicious food from Cocina 35, live music, and silk-screeners making festival shirts on site.

SDLFF

The 2018 film festival will run from March 15-25, 2018 and will feature movies at both AMC Fashion Valley and North Park’s Digital Gym Cinema. This year’s celebrations will include tributes to filmmakers and actors, a Virtual Reality Lounge, and live performances at the Sonido Latino stage. The Sabor Latino, food, beer, and wine festival, will also be returning with celebrated Latino chefs cooking up traditional and new Latin food, along with craft beers on tap, and Latin wines to sip on. All proceeds from Sabor Latino go to the Media Art Center San Diego’s youth education and outreach programs.

SDLFFThere were many filmmakers and actors in attendance at the party and I had the opportunity to speak with Patricia Chica. She directed the LGBTQ-centered film Morning After, which will be featured at the festival. The film is a coming of age drama about sexual fluidity and depicts a group of millennials who refuse to define themselves with the labels that society has put on them. As Patricia mentioned, this film is important in the environment we are living in now and is especially important for Latinos who may have traditional upbringings to understand that labels do not have to define them as a person. The film sounds exciting and an important one to watch, get your tickets and check this one out.

Festival passes are now on sale, along with a special edition 25th Anniversary VIP Pass for $325. Regular single tickets can be purchased starting March 1st, either on-site at the theaters or online. This is an enlightening and fun experience not to miss.

http://2018.sdlatinofilm.com/tickets/

SDLFF

 

Ragtime – The Berkeley Playhouse

The Berkeley Playhouse has brought one of the most acclaimed American musicals of the last twenty years to their stage, Ragtime, based on the celebrated novel by E. L. Doctorow. The story includes a multitude of perspectives all looking for the same thing, the American dream. America is changing at the turn of the 20th century and many are fearful of their privilege being diminished. Unwelcoming to Immigrants and/or trying to take advantage of them and continued racism and violence towards African-Americans. You’d think the story was based on today.

BP's_Ragtime_2We’re presented with three evolving stories on the East Coast that interconnect in time, although it ends in song and dance one story still ends somberly.  We meet an affluent white family led by “Mother” (Mindy Lym)  from suburban New Rochelle, New York; an African American musician, Coalhouse Walker Jr. (Dave J. Abrams) part of the Renaissance in Harlem; and Jewish immigrants, Tateh (Mischa Stephens) and his daughter (Molly Graham) who initially start out in the tenements of Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

BP's_Ragtime_3Mother (her character has no name) in New Rochelle begins to understand a little bit of her privilege after finding an abandoned baby. She finds the mom, Sarah (Marissa Rudd), who’s about to be imprisoned and promises to take responsibility for her and her child. Sarah ends up being the love of Coalhouse Walker Jr. and he desperately tries to convince her to come back to him each week. We never find out what happened between them prior. Tateh finds a new way to tell stories and ends up becoming successful. He eventually ends up meeting Mother after her family ends up in Atlantic City, New Jersey due to racist tensions at her New Rochelle home. They end up being the only two who move towards the American dream of infinite possibilities. 

BP's_Ragtime_4Interwoven into the story is the innocence of the children. We see the young boy (Elijah Cooper) observing the adults but not understanding their issues, he’s still open and honest with his observations. It’s interesting to think about where adults lose that innocence. Adults often admire it in young people as if they had not been that young once. When and where is that acceptance lost?

The Berkeley Playhouse does a great job bringing this to the small stage. We continue to be impressed by their casting, lighting, sound and show choices. They are inclusive, timely, and well executed. 

Ragtime boasts Tony Award-winning music and lyrics by the Broadway powerhouse duo, Stephen Flaherty and Lynn Ahrens(Once on This Island, Anastasia, Seussical), book by four-time Tony Award-winner Terrence McNally (The Full Monty, Love! Valour! Compassion!, Master Class).

Details: 

February 16 – March 18
Book by Terrence McNally
Music by Stephen Flaherty
Lyrics by Lynn Ahrens
Based on the novel Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow
Director William Hodgson
Music Director Daniel Feyer
Choreographer Alex Rodriguez

Get Tickets


 

The 59TH ANNUAL WHITE ELEPHANT SALE IS HERE!

White Elephant SaleIt’s that time of year again! The 59th annual White Elephant Sale in Northern California returns to Oakland March 3 and 4, 2018. It will feature 19 departments in a 96,000 Square Foot Warehouse. Items include, furniture, artwork, household goods and china, sporting gear, fine jewelry, collectibles, tools, music, books, vintage and contemporary clothing.

A preview sale will take place on Sunday, January 28 from 10 am to 4 pm. The event is organized and presented by the Oakland Museum Women’s Board and benefits the Oakland Museum of California. For the past three years, the Sale has raised over $2 Million. The event is made possible by donations from the public and is run by more than 1,000 volunteers.

Antiquers and bargain hunters often look forward to this event all year. It’s not uncommon to see rented trucks outside the door. You’ll want to wear comfortable shoes and arrive early. You can easily spend all day there looking for treasures for your home.

There will be a complimentary shuttle service from the Fruitvale BART to the WES warehouse provided for the January 28 Preview Sale and on the March 3 and 4 White Elephant Sale days.

Preview Sale tickets are $15 in advance at the OMCA Store, $16 online through the WES website, and $20 at the door. Tickets can be purchased in advance starting December 13. More information on how to purchase tickets can be found at WhiteElephantSale.org. Children under 12 are admitted free to the Preview Sale but must be accompanied by an adult at all times.

Admission is free for the main event on March 3 and 4.

DONATION INFORMATION

Donations of gently used good quality items are accepted year-round. For free van pickup call 510-839-5919. Visit WhiteElephantSale.org for donation information, including on which days drop-off donations are accepted at the warehouse at 333 Lancaster Street in Oakland, and a list of items that cannot be accepted.

ABOUT THE OAKLAND MUSEUM WOMEN’S BOARD

The sole purpose of the Oakland Museum Women’s Board (OMWB), a dedicated group with 114 year-round members, has been to raise money to support the Oakland Museum of California acquisitions, exhibitions, educational programs, capital improvements, and more. Since 1959, the OMWB has contributed over $22 million to the Museum. With the help of a thousand dedicated volunteers, they work year-round to organize and present the White Elephant Sale held annually during the first weekend in March which attracts shoppers from the Bay Area and beyond.

ABOUT THE OAKLAND MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA

The Oakland Museum of California (OMCA) brings together collections of art, history and natural science under one roof to tell the extraordinary stories of California and its people. OMCA’s groundbreaking exhibits tell the many stories that comprise California with many voices, often drawing on first-person accounts by people who have shaped California’s cultural heritage. Visitors are invited to actively participate in the Museum as they learn about the natural, artistic and social forces that affect the state and investigate their own role in both its history and its future. With more than 1.9 million objects, OMCA is a leading cultural institution of the Bay Area and a resource for the research and understanding of California’s dynamic cultural and environmental heritage. 

Making Your Donation Count: 10 Tips for Holiday Giving

Guest Post

Paul Downey_PS_2016By Paul Downey, Serving Seniors, President and CEO

The air is chilly. You’re humming holiday songs. You’re calculating how much vacation time you’ve accrued. The holiday season has arrived! Amid the festivities, it’s time to decide on end-of-year donations. But in today’s segmented world, with countless charities for every cause, how do you pick the right one? For starters, look for groups with strong leadership who operate by a mission that matches your passions or beliefs, and of course make sure your charity of choice is fiscally responsible, ethical and effective.

How do you know if your charity of choice is effective? Ideally, 85 cents of every dollar raised should go directly to programs and services of the charitable organization. Review the organization’s administrative costs and make sure you’re comfortable with what they spend on operational expenses, salaries and fundraising.

Here are 10 additional tips for smart holiday giving:

DO

  1. Verify that the charity is legitimate. Identify the correct name of the charity; many scammers establish fake charities with names that sound similar to real organizations’ names. Consult the BBB Wise Giving Alliance, Charity Navigator and GuideStar. Also look for audits, annual reports and 990 tax forms on the charity’s website.
  2. Ask for a tour. A reputable charity will happily show you around and answer your questions.
  3. Sign up for updates informing donors of how gifts were used and what outcomes were achieved with the donated funds.
  4. Protect your bank account and social security numbers. Charities don’t need this information to process your gift.
  5. Take immediate action if you suspect you’ve been affected by fraud. Call your bank and credit card companies and freeze your accounts. They’ll work with you to resolve your situation.

DON’T

  1. Donate in response to a hard sell. Don’t respond to anyone who says you “must” donate today or offers to pick up a check. A reputable charity will accept a gift today, next week, next month or even next year, and won’t pressure you.
  2. Make an online donation using a public wireless network. Use a password-protected network and verify that the donation page is secure: look for “https” in the URL and trust seals on the page. Before entering any personal info, double check that you’ve typed the URL correctly. If you click on an email link from a trusted sender, double check that you’ve arrived at the organization’s real website.
  3. Use your debit card, send cash or wire funds. If fraud is committed against your credit card, you can dispute the charges. If fraud is committed against your debit card, the funds are much harder to retrieve.
  4. Give to “pop up” charities. Don’t respond to on-the-spot donation requests from people in front of stores, even if they tell you that you’re helping people affected by natural disasters or recent tragedies. If the cause piques your interest, do some research. If the charity is legitimate, you’ll be able to mail a check or donate securely online.
  5. Give any personal info over the phone or to door-to-door solicitors. Caller identification is easy for scammers to fake; even if they appear to be calling from a real charity, it’s not necessarily true. As with “pop up” charities, if the organization sounds like one you’d like to support, do some research first.

You have a finite amount of hard-earned dollars that you can afford to donate, and you want those dollars to make the greatest impact possible. Trust your instincts and don’t be afraid to ask for clarification on statistics, details on tangible impacts and client stories or testimonials. Even if privacy or anonymity must be maintained, a reputable charity will have anecdotes that are “safe” for sharing. Bottom line: you’re giving away your hard-earned money for something you believe in. You decide where and when it goes. Charities that are worth donating to respect and appreciate this, and will respect and appreciate you.

For more than two decades, Paul Downey has been a national advocate for low-income seniors as well as the president and CEO of Serving Seniors, a nonprofit agency dedicated for more than 45 years to increasing the quality of life for San Diego seniors living in poverty. Learn more at www.servingseniors.org.


 

Opera in the Park – Huge Hit in San Francisco

The San Francisco Opera presents Opera in The Park. Featuring Music Director Nicola Luisotti conducting the San Francisco Opera Orchestra and stars from the fall season including Leah Crocetto, Diana Damrau, Heidi Stober, Ekaterina Semenchuk, Piotr Beczala, Michael Fabiano and Elliot Madore. In Golden Gate Park's Sharon Meadows on Sunday afternoon, September 13, 2015.

The San Francisco Opera presents Opera in The Park
Photo: Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Opera

This year’s roster for Opera in the Park included sopranos Sarah Cambidge, Amina Edris, Aurelia Florian and Toni Marie Palmertree; mezzo-soprano Jill Grove; tenors Atalla Ayan, Brian Jagde, Pene Pati and Kyle van Schoonhoven; baritone Artur Ruciński; and bass-baritone Alfred Walker performing arias and duets by Puccini, Verdi, Wagner, Bellini, Beethoven and Gounod along with traditional songs including “This little light of mine” and “The house I live in.” The concert began with Maestro Luisotti conducting the overture to Verdi’s Nabucco. Nearly 10,000 people attended the free event at Golden Gate Park. 

The afternoon climaxed with a performance of “Nessun dorma” from Puccini’s Turandot sung in a special arrangement for three tenors, which was followed by the traditional Opera in the Park closing encore of “Libiamo” from Verdi’s La Traviata, performed by the entire group of soloists along with the audience. Matthew Shilvock, General Director of San Francisco Opera, served as master of ceremonies.

Opera in the Park, presented in partnership with the San Francisco Chronicle, is one of San Francisco’s most cherished traditions. Established by former San Francisco Opera General Director Kurt Herbert Adler in 1971, the annual Opera in the Park free concert has included in past years opera legends from Luciano Pavarotti and Plácido Domingo to Beverly Sills and Marilyn Horne.

For tickets to the San Francisco Opera’s current season go to: https://sfopera.com/


 

Winter – Defining What Is Living

The Central Works Rolling World Premiere of Winter by Julie Jensen and directed by Gary Graves, has been extended until August 20. The central theme of the play explores the polarizing topic of whether or not one has the right to die on their own terms. It was inspired by the chapter “Robeck”, in Margaret Pabst Battin’s book, “Ending Life: Ethics & the Way We Die”.

Annis (Phoebe Moyer* ), with husband Robeck (Randall Nakano*) Photo by Jim Norrena

Annis (Phoebe Moyer*), with husband Robeck (Randall Nakano*) Photo by: Jim Norrena

Annis (Phoebe Moyer) is beginning to show the symptoms of what appears to be a type of dementia. Once a brilliant writer, she now can’t remember basic things and has black out type moments. The audience experiences these confusing episodes with rapid light changes and a distracting audio track. We see Annis get a blank look in her eye and then, she snaps out of it. Her self-awareness leads her to make the personal decision, it’s her time to die.

Her husband Robeck (Randall Nakano) is going through his own struggles as he’s being pushed out of his job at the University. She tells him about her discomfort but he dismisses it. It appears to be out of his own distress in dealing with ageing and the solitude that can come with it. They have a pact but for him, it’s not time.

As if individual struggles weren’t enough, they have two sons who fight about which one of them knows what’s best for their parents. Her younger son Evan (Steve Budd) has already had conversations with them and promised his full support. In his opinion, it’s their life and they can do what they want with it.

The eldest son Roddy (John Patrick Moore) becomes suspicious after Annis boxes up items of old stuff to give to each of them. He digs through their paperwork and other boxes that are packed up to find clues. He begins to question Evan, who vaguely admits their parents might be up to something. Roddy gets furious as he believes they should be ‘saved’ from themselves and be put in a home. He wants to control the situation as long as he has to do none of the work of actually caring for them.

Evan (Steve Budd) and his niece, LD (Julie Kuwabara). Photo by Jim Norrena

Evan (Steve Budd) and his niece, LD (Julie Kuwabara).
Photo by Jim Norrena

Annis reveals her plans to her granddaughter LD (Julie Kuwabara), who becomes key to carrying out her plan. She creates a secret code that only her granddaughter will understand. Even though she expresses her full support for her grandmother’s decision she still makes her promise that now is not the “right time”.

Moyer did a great job displaying the vulnerability and strength that her character has. Annis knows what’s coming for her and made a decision for herself influenced by her experience. But, the interference of family members makes you wonder; what is living? Is having a heartbeat living when you can’t function the way you feel your best and/or remember who you are? Do we live for ourselves or others? Is there a point where we don’t know what’s best for ourselves? It’s hard to not be touched by this thought-provoking show. 

Extended and must close August 20
The Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant Avenue, Berkeley.
Performances: Thurs, Fri & Sat at 8 pm, Sun at 5 pm
Prices: $30 online at centralworks.org, $30–$15 sliding scale at the door.
Thursdays are pay-what-you-can at the door.
Tickets:  510.558.1381 or centralworks.org


 

26th Annual Mama’s Day Tasting Extravaganza Fundraiser

The 26th annual Mama’s Day, benefiting Mama’s Kitchen, is scheduled for Friday, May 12 from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency La Jolla at Aventine located at 3777 La Jolla Village Drive. The fundraising event has always been a favorite of ours.  The event features more than 55 chefs from San Diego’s finest restaurants, hotels and catering companies.

Check out some of the mouth watering samples that are prepared for you while supporting an amazing organization. Many of these restaurants support Mama’s Day year after year.

Mama’s Day 2015
Mama’s Day 2016

The event helps to raise critical funds for Mama’s Kitchen’s mission to deliver hot, nutritious meals free of charge to local men, women and children affected by AIDS or cancer. Last year, Mama’s Day raised $165,000, which provided 51,000 home-delivered meals.

Guests enjoy food, music and fun throughout the evening.  Guests can also bid on  silent auction items and/or participate in an opportunity drawing. 

It’s an amazing event worth so much more than the ticket price. We hope you can make it! 

The event is presented by Nordstrom and hosted by Sycuan, Mama’s Day pre-sale tickets are available for just $150 per person and $175 at the door. Premium VIP tickets are available for $250 each, and include early access at 5:30 p.m. to an exclusive VIP dining area and pre-party featuring a private culinary presentation by Chef Bernard Guillas of The Marine Room before the doors open to general admission attendees at 6:30 p.m. VIPs also enjoy a full hosted bar for two hours.

Tickets may be purchased online at www.mamaskitchen.org

About Mama’s Kitchen
Mama’s Kitchen was founded in 1990 when volunteers from the AIDS Assistance Fund discovered that many of their clients were becoming too ill to take care of themselves. They realized that a reliable home meal delivery service was needed to ensure that these individuals would continue to receive nutritious, life-sustaining food. In 2004, Mama’s Pantry was opened to provide individuals with HIV/AIDS who are able to prepare meals the opportunity to supplement their nutritional needs. During the past 26 years, Mama’s Kitchen has served over eight million meals and has never turned away a client who qualified for our services. Our commitment to our clients remains unchanged and today the organization has expanded its service to San Diegans affected by either AIDS or cancer. Mama’s Kitchen provides three meals a day, for every day of the year, free of charge, to approximately 350 men, women, and children in San Diego County.